Advertising forms reputation. Reputation puts demands on companies to be more honest.

picture source: jeffjacoby.com

Thom Dinsdale @thomdinsdale

Thanks to Andy Walsh for forwarding me this Tweet.  Interesting isn’t it?

It reminds me of The 4891 Theory (the inverse of 1984).

In Orwell’s dystopian masterpiece the general public was constantly watched by Big Brother and nothing went unremarked or unpunished. 

In reality it is the great and the famous people of the world who are constantly under scrutiny from the general public.  The famous now can’t escape punishment for unacceptable behaviour whether it is inappropriate remarks from politicians (http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2012/jan/05/diane-abbott-twitter-row-racism) or goings on by prominent footballers (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/twitter/8531175/Ryan-Giggs-named-as-Premier-League-footballer-in-gagging-order-row.html).

And how world leaders are allowed to keep talking with their mics still attached escapes me.  That’s like media buyers overhearing what media owners say about them in the pub after the negotiation. (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2058966/Nicolas-Sarkozy-called-Israeli-Prime-Minister-Benjamin-Netanyahu-liar-Obama.html).

So the bigger a star you are the more careful you need to be about your reputation. 

Exactly true for a brand too.

The more famous and esteemed your brand reputation is the greater the need to tell the truth.

http://tellthetruthbook.com/

  • Gary Bembridge

    Doing the right thing has to be important for all brands – no matter how big they are. As although the noise and drama may not be as big as when a celebrity or star “goes wrong” – the effects can be fatal.

    I think tit is too easy for brands and businesses to let doing the right thing slip, especially when things gets tough and they see others around them taking short cuts or pushing the boundaries of what is legitimate. But, as my mother used to say “the good guys always win in the end”. It is always important to focus on the high ground and the implications of what you are doing. We are see the consequences of the ruthless drive and demand to get prices down of products leading to more pressure on the suppliers – and more cases of workers being taken advantage of, terrible conditions – or animals being treated badly to drive down costs.

    We need to always think of consequences. What would we think and feel if we were an outsider looking on and saw the practices taking place? This is always a good way of having a sense check. The other is the “red face test”, how would you feel if you have to look your mother in the eye and tell her what you are doing……

  • Gary Bembridge

    Very thought provoking article, and thanks for the link to the book.

    Doing the right thing has to be important for all brands – no matter how big they are. As although the noise and drama may not be as big as when a celebrity or star “goes wrong” – the effects can be fatal.I think it is too easy for brands and businesses to let doing the right thing slip, especially when things gets tough and they see others around them taking short cuts or pushing the boundaries of what is legitimate. But, as my mother used to say “the good guys always win in the end”. It is always important to focus on the high ground and the implications of what you are doing. We are see the consequences of the ruthless drive and demand to get prices down of products leading to more pressure on the suppliers – and more cases of workers being taken advantage of, terrible conditions – or animals being treated badly to drive down costs.We need to always think of consequences. What would we think and feel if we were an outsider looking on and saw the practices taking place? This is always a good way of having a sense check. The other is the “red face test”, how would you feel if you have to look your mother in the eye and tell her what you are doing……I have blogged about this area as well: 

    http://www.garybembridge.com/2008/02/why-always-doing-right-thing-is-not.html

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